Wastewater improvements come into focus

Steve Smith
ssmith@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 1/18/22

After an hour-plus presentation, Fort Lupton City Council has an idea of the cost of mandatory improvements to its wastewater plant and the best route to transport the material to Metro Wastewater …

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Wastewater improvements come into focus

Posted

After an hour-plus presentation, Fort Lupton City Council has an idea of the cost of mandatory improvements to its wastewater plant and the best route to transport the material to Metro Wastewater Reclamation District. 

During a Jan. 11 town hall, public works Director Roy Vestal pegged the price tag at $31 million; when discussion started a year ago, the price tag was $38 million. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is requiring the upgrades to cut down on the amount of nitrogen and phosphorus in wastewater. 

The easiest route for the anticipated six-mile pipeline from the plant to Metro Wastewater is U.S. Highway 85. 

Ryan Brong, a staff civil engineer with Burns and McDonnell, said the Colorado Department of Transportation was on board. 

“We expect the work to be as far off the road and onto the pavement as possible,” he told council. “We expect most of the construction to be done without impacting traffic on the road.” 

As for potential problems with landowners on the west side of U.S. 85, Brong didn’t anticipate the necessary work to encroach on property lines. 

“We expect the work to be along the CDOT right of way,” Brong said. “Our work wouldn’t be on anyone’s property line. The fact that CDOT is a partner? That’s a big win. Negotiations with each of the property owners could be very difficult.” 

The plan is to have about 60 percent of the design work done by June. Groundbreaking is set for June 2023, and the deadline to complete the repairs is the summer of 2024. 

The city and Metro have an unsigned contract as of Jan. 11. The only thing left was a potential cost. Council couldn’t make a decision on the contract Jan. 11 because of the format of the meeting. 

Start the discussions 

Council also bandied about the idea of moving its meeting times for town halls and business meetings to 6 p.m. Tuesdays. Council’s one question had to do with timing – specifically for those who finish their workday at 5 p.m., then go home and eat dinner and then return to City Hall for a 6 p.m. forum. 

Council also broached the subject of redistricting. The idea is to create wards of equal socio-economic and ethnic qualities. 

“We have some wards that are unequal,” Mayor Zo Stieber said.

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