Officer and woman he helped are reunited

Assistance with seizure took place in 1998

Elliott Wenzler
ewenzler@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 5/17/21

Twenty-three years after Parker Police Sgt. Joe Cummings responded to a 911 call about a 2-year-old girl seizing, he got to meet the woman who he helped treat that day. As Natalie Eckhoff, now 24, is …

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Officer and woman he helped are reunited

Assistance with seizure took place in 1998

Posted

Twenty-three years after Parker Police Sgt. Joe Cummings responded to a 911 call about a 2-year-old girl seizing, he got to meet the woman who he helped treat that day.

As Natalie Eckhoff, now 24, is preparing to begin her own career, her mother felt it was a good time to meet the officer and thank him for his help that day.

“We sure appreciate you,” said Natalie's mother, Diane Eckhoff, as the family and officer met in the Parker Police Department May 10.

The day that Cummings first met the Eckhoff family, back in 1998, Diane had just brought Natalie home from daycare and noticed she had a slight fever. Soon after, Natalie began seizing. Diane immediately called 911.

“She was turning a speckly kind of color and I figured that was no good,” Diane said.

Cummings and his partner arrived and quickly assessed the situation and helped treat Natalie.

“I remember when I picked you up, you were arched … and blue,” Cummings said.

She soon stopped seizing and hasn't had any similar events since, Diane said.

“We were so thankful,” Diane said. “I don't know if we would have been able to know what to do if they had not just been right on point.”

Natalie, who recently graduated from Arapahoe Community College, is working on earning a bachelor's degree in early childhood education.

“I think he's a hero,” Natalie said. “He did very well that day when we needed it the most.”

Diane, who held onto Cummings' business card for more than two decades since this incident, recently messaged the sergeant online to let him know she wanted to thank him for his work that day.

“I know those are just words but I had to say them,” she said. “It was very important to me. Because that meant so much.”

Cummings has been with the Parker Police for 24 years and in law enforcement for 36 years.

“I'm very honored to meet these folks and it's nice to see a happy ending,” Cummings said. “Especially in today's day and age where law enforcement gets such a negative rap it's nice to see that as I'm coming to the end, that maybe I did make a difference,” he said.

“You did,” Diane responded.

Their reuniting coincided with National Police Week, an annual event commemorating law enforcement officers who have died in the line of duty.

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