Council OKs ‘best route’ for wastewater work

Steve Smith
ssmith@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 1/25/22

Fort Lupton City Council thinks U.S. Highway 85 is the best route to transport materials once the mandatory wastewater treatment improvements begin. The vote was unanimous during a business meeting …

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Council OKs ‘best route’ for wastewater work

Posted

Fort Lupton City Council thinks U.S. Highway 85 is the best route to transport materials once the mandatory wastewater treatment improvements begin.

The vote was unanimous during a business meeting Jan. 18.

Roy Vestal, public works director, said U.S.85 was “the most beneficial and the least impactful” after a cost analysis.

“We will save $5 million” by using US 85 “instead of going out to (Weld County) Road 23, Vestal said. “The next step is to walk the route.”

The Colorado Department of Health and Environment is requiring cities, including Fort Lupton, to decrease the amount of phosphorus and nitrogen in its wastewater plants.

In other business, the council also unanimously approved a $500 increase in residential tap fees and sewer tap fees.

Staff notes said the increase was necessary because of an anticipated need to expand water and sewer plants over the next 20 years. The city pegged that work at $76 million, according to staff notes. The new residential water tap fee is $8,000 per tap. Sewer fees increased to $10,000.

“We are running barely above the ranks of our neighbors,” Vestal told council. “We’re not outpricing ourselves. We are covering ourselves.”

Sketch plan revisions

Council also approved a change in sketch plans for the Cottonwood Greens development near Ninth Street and Weld County Road 31.

Planner Alyssa Knutson said the addition brings in a new parcel of land – a bit more than 156 acres – on the southern end of the development. When built out, there will be 410 single-family detached homes and 137 single-family attached units, plus a clubhouse, neighborhood dog park, pocket parks and trails, according to staff notes.

The vote was unanimous.

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