City employees have high marks for job

Satisfaction, supervision rated highly while pay, benefits lag

Scott Taylor
staylor@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 3/3/22

Fort Lupton’s city employees — at least 106 of them — like what they do and where they work, but they don’t think much of what they get paid. That’s the result of a survey of city employees …

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City employees have high marks for job

Satisfaction, supervision rated highly while pay, benefits lag

Posted

Fort Lupton’s city employees — at least 106 of them — like what they do and where they work, but they don’t think much of what they get paid.

That’s the result of a survey of city employees released to City Councilors at their Feb. 22 Town Hall meeting.

Human Resources Director Laura Howe said the survey was sent to 169 municipal employees across all city departments and 106 returned completed surveys. That included a mix of mostly full-time employees and about half as many part-time workers.

Department supervision, employee engagement, job satisfaction and their ability to maintain a balance between work and their life outside of work were all rated highly, nearly four out of four.

But the benefits and pay were rated near the bottom.

“I guess that’s not a-typical,” said City GIS Specialist Jake Freier. “Everybody wants to make more money. It’s one of the common gripes. But they are really happy with supervision and overall job satisfaction.”

Relationships

The highest ratings were related to supervision and relationships, Howe said.

“Employees feel very connected to their supervisors,” Howe said. “We are super proud of that. Also, relationships with co-workers are very important. That’s what we say when we love where we work: ‘I love the people I work with.’ That’s true here, too.”

Howe said she is especially pleased with one of the questions rating, employee motivation.

“The statement is ‘I am motivated to do my best work,’” she said. “That result is pretty incredible coming out of a pandemic, where things are tough. We have had to work in ways that I don’t think any of us imagined and we are still motivated.”

Howe said she suspects the employee motivation comes from employees knowing they are working for the public.

“We serve the people, not stockholders,” she said. “I think there is more meaning in the work and people seem to be more motivated by that.”

The low rating for benefits and pay surprised her, however. More than half of all Fort Lupton employees disagreed with the idea that they are paid fairly compared to others doing similar work in other organizations.

She said she was troubled about the low rating of employee benefits since public employees usually have good health insurance and benefits. She needs to research that more deeply.

“What are they comparing themselves to?” Howe said. “Are they looking at jobs in the private sector where they can make a lot more money? So, I’m not sure how I want to collect more information, but I feel like that’s an area where we want to poke at.”

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