Butterfly Pavilion focuses on Birdwings

New display features unique butterflies in January

Staff Report
Posted 1/11/22

Westminster’s Butterfly Pavilion will feature a unique species through Jan. 31, the Birdwing butterflies. The Pavilion invites visitors to “Beauty of the Birdwing” to immerse themselves among …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution in 2021-2022, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access includes access to all websites and online content.


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Butterfly Pavilion focuses on Birdwings

New display features unique butterflies in January

Posted

Westminster’s Butterfly Pavilion will feature a unique species through Jan. 31, the Birdwing butterflies.

The Pavilion invites visitors to “Beauty of the Birdwing” to immerse themselves among hundreds of beautiful, big, and spectacular Birdwing butterflies while learning more about these vulnerable invertebrates and how to help protect them.

The Common Green Birdwing (Ornithoptera priamus) is among the largest butterflies in the world, with an astonishing wingspan of up to one foot in length. They are found in the tropics of Southeast Asia and Australasia - and now are featured in Butterfly Pavilion’s conservatory, allowing guests a rare experience to observe them up-close in glorious flight.

“These butterflies will have been in their chrysalis form for nearly a month, so when they emerge and are released into our conservatory it is an exciting and wondrous sight for returning and new visitors to witness,” says Shiran Hershcovich, Lepidopterist Manager at Butterfly Pavilion said in a written statement. “The event is both engaging and educational providing an opportunity to see these butterflies up close while learning more about them and their need for protection.”

The species features bright colors that serve as a visible warning to predators of their toxicity. However, the large size and bright coloration make them a regular target of their most feared predator of all - human poachers. People are drawn to their rarity and their stunning colors, making them highly sought after as part of the illegal trade industry.

All species of birdwing butterflies are protected under CITES, an international agreement that aims to ensure that the international trade of vulnerable animals does not threaten their survival.

The Pavillion’s Birdwings, as with all their invertebrates, are sourced from sustainable butterfly suppliers that our organization works with as part of our conservation initiatives.

“Our butterfly suppliers are not just vendors, but our conservation partners around the world,” Hershcovich said. “By visiting Butterfly Pavilion, beyond experiencing the Birdwings, you are supporting sustainable wildlife-based economies like butterfly farms that help combat illegal trade, as well as our global field conservation projects”.

The pavilion is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tickets are $14.50, $12.50 for seniors and $9.50 for children. Pavilion members can attend with free admission.

To learn more and purchase tickets, visit: https://butterflies.org/event/birdwing/

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.