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Education

  • Workers finish first round of FLHS upgrades

    Workers are finished with the first round of a $9.3 million upgrade at Fort Lupton High School – just in time for school to start.

    Construction workers from Haselden Construction in Centennial built a new parking lot, replaced the roof, painted the core areas inside the school. They also made other improvements, including installing a new heating and cooling system, installing new energy-saving lighting in the “commons,” remodeling science classrooms and the auditorium, and replacing existing chairs and tables.

  • Bueno CAMP helps college students take first step

    Aims Community College students in the Bueno College Assistance Migrant Program are often the first ones in their families to attend college.

    They receive free tuition their freshman year, free books, tutoring, counseling, and a $75 monthly stipend, workers say. Students must have at least one relative who is a migrant worker to be eligible to apply.

    For many, it’s a game-changer. More than 200 students have graduated from college since the program started in 2001.

  • Luekenga is new executive campus director at Aims

    Julie Luekenga says she wasn’t looking for a new job when the Aims Community College executive campus director position opened up recently at the Fort Lupton campus.

  • Homyak leaves a legacy of a lifetime

    Former Fort Lupton High School Principal Kenneth Homyak, 95, saw some students necking in the hall the other day but stopped himself from saying anything.

    “I wanted to do something, but I told myself, ‘You’re not the principal anymore,’” Homyak told a reporter later.

    Homyak has seen a lot change in Fort Lupton during his lifetime, including when he worked in the Weld Re-8 school district for 41 years.

    He said he relished the opportunity he had to be principal during a more simple time of school administration.

  • Aims Community College to choose new executive campus director

    Aims Community College – Fort Lupton branch’s hiring committee is expected to choose between an insider and a candidate from California to lead the campus into the future.

    Job candidate Julie Luekenga currently works at Aims – Fort Lupton; Elyane Harney currently teaches business classes at Central Washington University in Seattle. Each spoke at a public forum Thursday, July 6, about why she should be the new executive campus director. 

  • Aims to host two finalists for executive campus director

    One finalist is an insider to be executive campus director of the Aims Community College’s Fort Lupton campus, the other is an outsider. 

    Finalist Julie Luekenga has worked at Aims since 2014. She’s currently the school’s academic resource center assistant director and an adjunct instructor. Finalist Elyane Harney teaches business classes at Central Washington University in Seattle. The two women will talk at a public forum slated for 8:45 a.m. Thursday, July 6.

  • Two new schools, two new names

    Two new names chosen for Weld Re-8's two upcoming schools reflect town heritage and district leadership.

    The new Kenneth Homyak PK-8 School is going up in Dacono and Little Trappers Preschool is being built in Fort Lupton. "PK" stands for pre-kindergarten, or preschool; "8" stands for eighth grade.

    “I love them. I think it’s awesome,” said Alan Kaylor, Weld Re-8 superintendent.

  • Carbon Valley Dreamers wants volunteers

    For Madeline Nelson, 9, of Firestone, school always has been an academic and social challenge.

    “Like kindergarten, first grade, she’d have one friend, and that is it,” said her mother Sara Nelson, 30.

    This school year was different for the third-grader.

    “I had more practice with dreamers and stuff. We did a lot of math, and we had to read stuff a lot,” Madeline explained.

  • Weld Re-8 wants help naming two new schools

     

    Weld Re-8 School Board members want your help to name two new schools under construction – a $6.8 million preschool/administration building in Fort Lupton and a $17.5 million K-8 school in Dacono.

  • Migrant children attend summer program, festival

    Changing schools, learning a new town, and having to make new friends almost every year can make things difficult for the children of migrants to call any one place home. 

    Every summer, the Weld-Re8 school district puts on a weeklong migrant program to provide a sense of community and belonging to such children. About 45 migrant children from preschool to 12th grade participated in literacy, math, reading and writing classes and art, games, and crafts at Fort Lupton Middle School in this year’s program.