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Community News

  • Suicide prevention tips

    Suicide is a preventable act, but only if initiative is taken.

    Officials say that to prevent this horrible act, action must take place and questions must asked, not next

    week, not tomorrow, but now.

    “The most direct way you ask the question, the best results you will get,” said Michelle Dalpra, educator

    for suicide education and support services for North Range Behavioral Health. “Don’t wait to ask the

  • Last delivery for postman Doherty

    Fort Lupton residents will no longer see a familiar face when they get their mail.

    Longtime local United States Postal Service employee Mike Doherty is hanging up his mail bag after 21 years. For Doherty it’s a bittersweet moment, with a chance to enjoy retirement on the way but chances to see his many Fort Lupton friends possibly no longer.

    “I’ll miss everybody, I’ve had the same people on the same routes for 21 years, so I know everybody,” said Doherty.

  • World War II veteran Leo Bissell remembers

    Longtime Fort Lupton resident Leo Bissell has more life experiences than most people can even imagine, tending to two different farms, fighting in World War II and raising a family in Fort Lupton.

    The 93-year old and his daughter Lindsay Bissell, 67 shared his life story recently at the Ashley Manor Memory Care facility in Fort Lupton.

  • Habitat for Humanity to buy land, build home in Dacono

    Officials at the Longmont nonprofit group plan to knock down the existing home and build a new one, as part of the group’s plan to generally upgrade homes in the Glens of Dacono neighborhood, according to Tom Teixeira, executive director of the  Greeley-Weld Housing Authority. The neighborhood includes mobile homes and small houses near Colorado Highway 52 in Dacono.

     “It was available, and they (Habitat for Humanity of the St. Vrain Valley) had a willing seller,” Teixeira said.

  • Church members seek historic designation

    Walking into the Fort Lupton United Methodist Church is a bit like taking a time machine into another era.

    The church is a vestige of “old Fort Lupton,” built in 1916.

  • Former mayor Holton leaves legacy of growth

    Former Fort Lupton Mayor Tommy Holton recently completed his final term as mayor after serving from 2009 to 2017.

    He said that after eight years on the job, he feels like he has learned a thing or two.

    “Being able to work with people,” said Holton. “Learning how to work with (city) council and getting the rest of people on board with a vision.”

  • Historic preservation board looking for members

    Interested in Fort Lupton’s history and its historic buildings?

    City historic preservation board members may have just the job for you They need two new colleagues to help review proposed changes to historic buildings just as business is picking up in historic downtown. The volunteer positions were left open after former historic preservation members Barbara Duncan and Tim Hoskens left the board.

  • Fort Lupton considers changing two road names

    Fort Lupton officials could change the street names of some county roads inside city limits as part of a

    plan to help strengthen community identity.

    All of Weld County Road 27 would be called South Denver Avenue inside city limits, and all of Weld

    County Road 12 would be named Cemetery Lane inside city limits, if the plan officials said. In several

  • City considering changing two road names

    Fort Lupton officials could change the street names of some county roads inside city limits as part of a
    plan to help strengthen community identity.
    All of Weld County Road 27 would be called South Denver Avenue inside city limits, and all of Weld
    County Road 12 would be named Cemetery Lane inside city limits, if the plan officials said. In several
    places, homes and businesses are just outside of city limits, but the streets are now inside of city limits,
    officials said. City council members decided they want more information on how the address changes

  • City may increase water rates by 10 percent

    Fort Lupton residents could see a 10 percent increase in their water bills in 2018 to help pay for a $10 million storage reservoir at the Fort Lupton Water Treatment Plant at Weld County roads 16 and 21.

    Rates are expected to go up by about $15 per year, if city council members approve the rate hike, according to Claud Hanes, city administrator. A typical water bill on a medium-sized home is about $75 per month, or $412 for 1,000 gallons of water used. City officials do not plan to increase base rates.